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Models in political science are often poorly specified prior to testing. In practice, most analysts rely on regression analysis to determine the weights for each independent variable (causal factor) identified in the model. We demonstrate a method for determining the relative weights of causal...
Choice functions play an important role in political science. We present structure results of choice functions following an algebraic approach. It is logical that rational political actors are not able to perceive every alternative in a set of alternatives X. They may also choose to exclude some...
We use techniques of group decision making and consensus under fuzzy preferences and fuzzy majority developed so as to compare five methods used for determining the degree of causality of eight variables for democratic consolidation. In particular for Q denoting the linguistic variable 'most',...
Under certain aggregation rules, particular subsets of the voting population fully characterize the social preference relation, and the preferences of the remaining voters become irrelevant. In the traditional literature, these types of rules, i.e. voting and simple rules, have received...
The literature involving fuzzy Arrow results uses the same independence of irrelevant alternatives condition. We introduce three other types of independence of irrelevant alternative conditions and show that they can be profitably used in the examination of Arrow's theorem. We also generalize...
Black's Median Voter Theorem is among the more useful mathematical tools available to political scientists for predicting choices of political actors based on their preferences over a finite set of alternatives within an institutional or constitutional setting. If the alternatives can be placed...