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Persistent link: https://www.econbiz.de/10003322287
Using micro panel data, labor market transitions are analyzed for the EU-member states by cumulative year-by-year transition probabilities. As female (non-)employment patterns changed more dramatically than male employment in past decades, the analyses mainly refer to female labor supply. In...
Persistent link: https://www.econbiz.de/10003346298
In 14 member states of the European Union, women's relative to men's levels of job satisfaction are compared by using data of the European Household Community Panel. The countries under consideration can be assigned to three different groups. Denmark, Finland and the Netherlands do not show...
Persistent link: https://www.econbiz.de/10003230650
Persistent link: https://www.econbiz.de/10010503429
The paper discusses gender differences with regard to the self- and reciprocal estimation of career expectations. Firstly, the theoretical background and the literature are identified. Within this frame, the instance of self-under-estimated career prospects of female workers and statistical...
Persistent link: https://www.econbiz.de/10010356679
Persistent link: https://www.econbiz.de/10001736014
Persistent link: https://www.econbiz.de/10008749387
Based on a unique case study-dataset, the paper analyses job satisfaction and public service motivation in Germany. A special issue of the investigation is related to the evaluation of performance pay scales that were introduced some years ago to German public employees within the frame of...
Persistent link: https://www.econbiz.de/10010239262
In the late nineties, Germany was often seen as a laggard with respect to labor market and welfare state reforms with institutional inertia being reflected in notoriously sluggish employment growth and rising unemployment. Recent years, however, saw a complex sequence of reforms with regard to...
Persistent link: https://www.econbiz.de/10003348540
Using micro panel data, labor market transitions are analyzed for the EU-member states by cumulative year-by-year transition probabilities. As female (non-)employment patterns changed more dramatically than male employment in past decades, the analyses mainly refer to female labor supply. In...
Persistent link: https://www.econbiz.de/10003316483