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Strategy teams have received little attention in the strategic management literature. The goal of this article is to fill this theoretical and empirical gap by studying the practices of strategy teams. Drawing upon an in-depth longitudinal case study of a FTSE-100 multibusiness firm and evidence...
This article returns to address the strengths and limitations of Pettigrew 1985 and 1987. It then responds to two of the main deficiencies of those publications. These are the failure to link context to process to outcome in those studies and in process scholarship more generally and the limited...
Organising to obtain substantial performance advantages is an active and continuous process. It involves managing complex interdependencies and is not simply a journey with a fixed end-point which replaces one static organisation structure with another. Moreover, business leaders who are...
Argues that management needs to be 'joined up', i.e. that it needs to acknowledge the interdependence of all parts of the organization and understand that strategy, structure and systems need to complement each other. Summarizes research into what is termed complementary change. Draws on work...
Looks at the factors which drive and stabilise training activity. These include business strategic factors such as new products; the external/ internal labour markets; internal factors such as management commitment or existing training systems; and external training stimuli and support. Examines...