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In this paper we present a new approach to incorporate default dependency in intensity-based default risk models. The model uses an arbitrary default dependency structure which is specified by the Copula of the times of default, this is combined with individual intensity-based models for the...
This paper gives a simple introduction to portfolio credit risk models of the factor model type. In factor models, the dependence between the individual defaults is driven by a small number of systematic factors. When conditioning on the realisation of these factors the defaults become...
In this paper we present a tree model for defaultable bond prices which can be used for the pricing of credit derivatives. The model is based upon the two-factor Hull-White (1994) model for default-free interest rates, where one of the factors is taken to be the credit spread of the defaultable...
In this paper we examine the problem of partially hedging a given credit risk exposure. We derive hedges which satisfy certain optimality criteria: For a given investment into the hedge they minimize the remaining risk, or vice versa. This is motivated by the fact that it is a core business of...
The aim of this paper is the valuation and hedging of defaultable bonds and options on defaultable bonds. The Heath/Jarrow/Morton-framework is used to model the interest rate risk, and the time of default is determined by the first jump time of a point process. (...)
In this paper we consider the range of prices consistent with no arbitrage for European options in a general stochastic volatility model. We give conditions under which infimum respectively the supremum of the possible option prices are equal to the intrinsic value of the option or to the...
Standard derivative pricing theory is based on the assumption of the market for the underlying asset being infinitely elastic. We relax this hypothesis and study if and how a large agent whose trades move prices can replicate the payoff of a derivative contract. Our analysis extends a prior work...
Viewing binomial models as a discrete approximation of the respective continuous models, the interest focuses on the notions of convergence and especially "fast" convergence of prices. Though many authors were proposing new models, none of them could successfully explain better performance for...
We review the continuous-time literature on the so-called direct approach to bond option pricing. Going back to Ball and Torous (1983), this approach models bond price processes directly (i.e. without reference to interest rates or state variable processes) and applies methods that Black and...
We develop a new approach to pricing and hedging contingent claims in incomplete markets framework the no-arbitrage arguments that have been developed in complete markets leads us to defining the concept we are able to extend the no-arbitrage ideo to a world of incomplete markets in such a way...