• Acknowledgements
  • List of abbreviations
  • Referencing guide
  • List of figures
  • List of tables
  • Executive Summary
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1 Purpose and scope of the study
  • 1.2 Methodological approach
  • 1.3 Data access and representativeness
  • 1.4 Report structure
  • 1.5 Defining ‘organised crime’ and ‘corruption’
  • 1.6 Measuring Corruption and Organised Crime
  • 1.7 Policy context
  • 2. Corruption and organised crime: evidence from literature
  • 2.1 The literature review process
  • 2.2 General studies
  • 2.3 Judicial corruption and organised crime
  • 2.4 Political Corruption and organised crime
  • 2.5 Police corruption and organised crime
  • 2.6 Corruption in the military and organise crime
  • 2.7 Corruption in prisons and organise crime
  • 2.8 Administrative corruption and organised crime
  • 2.9 Private sector corruption
  • 3. Mapping corruption and organised crime in the EU
  • 3.1 Selecting indicators
  • 3.2 Linking corruption and organised crime: statistical evidence
  • 3.3 Clustering Member States – quantitative approach
  • 3.4 Qualitative data mapping organised crime and corruption in EU
  • 4. Organised crime, corruption and public bodies
  • 4.1 Data issues
  • 4.2 Political corruption and organised crime
  • 4.3 Police corruption
  • 4.4 Customs corruption
  • 4.5 Judicial corruption
  • 5. Organised crime, corruption, and the private sector
  • 5.1 Scope of private sector corruption
  • 5.2 Facilitating criminal activities
  • 5.3 Money laundering
  • 5.4 Professional services
  • 5.5 Abusing a company
  • 5.6 Anti-corruption measures
  • 6. Corruption and criminal markets
  • 6.1 Illegal cigarettes
  • 6.2 Prostitution and trafficking of human beings for sexual exploitation
  • 6.3 Drugs
  • 6.4 Vehicle-theft
  • 6.5 Extortion racketeering
  • 7. Conclusions and recommendations
  • 7.1 Key findings
  • 7.2 The impact of corruption
  • 7.3 Recommendations
  • Annex 1 - 11 Country study ...
  • Bibliography