• Executive summary
  • Introduction
  • Frame, purpose and scope of the study
  • Methodological approach<br< Methodological limitations<br< Structure of this report<br< 1. Synthesis of Evaluators‟ assessments
  • 1.1. Assessment per broad policy area
  • 1.1.1. Competitiveness
  • 1.1.2. Cohesion
  • 1.1.3. Natural resources
  • 1.1.4. Citizenship
  • 1.1.5. Global partnership
  • 1.2. Assessment per evaluation criterion
  • 1.2.1. Relevance
  • 1.2.2. Coherence
  • 1.2.3. European added value
  • 1.2.4. Effectiveness
  • 1.2.5. Sustainability
  • 1.2.6. Efficiency
  • 1.2.7. Unintended impacts
  • 2. Lessons learned
  • 2.1. Designing policies that work
  • 2.1.1. Prioritising objectives
  • 2.1.2. Integrating cross-cutting issues
  • 2.1.3. Formulating achievable strategies
  • 2.1.4. Considering the after-policy period from the outset
  • 2.2. Ensuring subsidiarity
  • 2.2.1. Adding trans-national value
  • 2.2.2. Dealing with critical mass
  • 2.2.3. Changing systems
  • 2.2.4. Securing local relevance
  • 2.3. Spending wisely
  • 2.3.1. Targeting participants and beneficiaries
  • 2.3.2. Avoiding deadweight
  • 2.3.3. Leveraging non-budgetary resources
  • 2.3.4. Making use of financial engineering
  • 2.3.5. Sharing the cost with other levels of government
  • 2.4. Seeking results
  • 2.4.1. Dealing with the pressure to spend
  • 2.4.2. Questioning command-and-control approaches
  • 2.4.3. Managing flexibility
  • 2.4.4. Considering performance incentives
  • 2.4.5. Learning from achievements
  • 3. Challenges, solutions and knowledge transfer
  • 3.1. Inducing structural changes
  • 3.2. Targeting beneficiaries accurately
  • 3.3. Decentralising whilst managing associated risks
  • 3.4. Focusing on results rather than absorption
  • 3.5. Promoting and monitoring leverage
  • Using this report
  • Appendix A – Database of available reports
  • A1 - Identifying the reports
  • A2 - Structure of the set of reports
  • A3 – Impartiality of the available reports
  • A4 - Assessing the potential interest of th