• PART I: METHODOLOGY
  • 1 ASSIGNMENT COLLECTING DATA
  • 1.1 The Research Team in charge of collecting information
  • 1.2 Determination of relevant information to implement Assignment 1
  • 1.2.1 Social and economic perspective
  • 1.2.2 Data collection procedures - Identification and confirmation of data sources
  • 1.2.3 Transparency of costs and reimbursement
  • 1.3 Regulation of the costs of justice
  • 1.3.1 Regulation by category
  • 1.3.2 Type of fee regulation
  • 2 Proceeding fees
  • 2.1 Fees for judicial proceedings
  • 2.1.1 Introduction
  • 2.1.2 Allocation of proceeding fees: the example of Greece
  • 2.1.3 Amount of proceeding fees
  • 2.1.4 How are the fees determined?
  • 2.1.5 Date and means of payment
  • 2.1.6 Exemptions
  • 2.1.7 Simplifying: main objective of the latest reforms
  • 2.2 Appeal fees
  • 2.3 E-justice
  • 2.3.1 Introduction
  • 2.3.2 Online proceedings, not much used
  • 2.3.3 The possibility to communicate with courts via internet is being developed in many Member States
  • 2.3.4 Online consultation of official documents or acts
  • 2.3.5 Claim filing by electronic means
  • 2.3.6 Video-conferencing during hearings
  • 2.3.7 Conclusion
  • 2.4 Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR)
  • 2.4.1 Introduction
  • 2.4.2 Types of ADR
  • 2.4.3 Recourse to ADR according to the nature of the dispute
  • 2.4.4 Choosing the ADR before the litigation takes place
  • 2.4.5 Determination of the fees
  • 3 LAWYERS’ FEES
  • 3.1 The schedules
  • 3.1.1 The schedules setting a minimum and / or a maximum: Italy and Greece
  • 3.1.2 Schedules fixing part of lawyers’ fees
  • 3.1.3 The rates applicable in where the contract terms remain silent
  • 3.2 Supervision of fees by general rules
  • 3.3 Success fees
  • 3.4 The reimbursement of lawyers’ fees
  • 3.4.1 The fixing of a minimum and / or a maximum based on the financial stake of the litigation: Belgium, Estonia, Lithuania, Slovakia and Latvia
  • 3.4.2 Use of the former schedule of fees: Denmark
  • 3.5 The mandatory representation by a