• 1 Introduction and overview
  • 1.1 Overview of the empirical research exercise
  • 1.2 The need for research
  • 1.3 The public policy context
  • 1.4 Outline of the current Report
  • 2 The public policy background: Should economic and social rights be codified in a new Bill of Rights and / or a written constitution?
  • 2.1 The evolution of public policy on human rights under Labour (1997-2010)
  • 2.2 International models for judicial enforcement of economic and social rights
  • 2.3 Proposals for codifying economic and social rights in a Bill of Rights
  • 2.4 The 2010 General Election: The policy positions of the major parties
  • 2.5 Conclusion
  • 3 Public attitudes towards economic and social rights: Literature and data review
  • 3.1 Survey evidence on public attitudes towards civil and political rights
  • 3.2 Surveys that include specific questions on economic and social rights
  • 3.3 Surveys that include specific questions on public attitudes towards human rights / the Human Rights Act
  • 3.4 MOJ research exercise on public attitudes towards a Bill of Rights and Responsibilities
  • 3.5 Power2010 deliberative research on public attitudes towards a Bill of Rights
  • 3.6 Public attitudes towards the Rights of Disabled People: Findings from cognitive interviews
  • 3.7 Burchardt and Vizard (2007, 2009): Deliberative research exercise to develop a list of freedoms and real opportunities
  • 3.8 Methodologies for characterising and classifying population values
  • 3.9 Conclusion
  • 4 Public attitudes towards economic and social rights: In-depth empirical analysis using the Citizenship Survey “Rights and Responsibilities” Module
  • 4.1 Aims of the research exercise
  • 4.2 Overview of the Citizenship Survey and the “Rights and Responsibilities” Module
  • 4.3 The overall picture of public support for rights
  • 4.4 Logistic regression research exercise
  • 4.5 Further investigation of the equivalent household income findings using alternative model specifications
  • 4.6 Relative importance of the independent variables
  • 4.