• Executive summary
  • Introduction
  • Part I. Gender gaps in subjective wellbeing: the broad picture
  • I.1. Concepts
  • I.1.1. Global cognitive evaluations
  • I.1.2. Mental health scores
  • I.1.3. Short-run emotional affects
  • I.2. General Findings about the Gender Gap
  • I.2.1. Women are happier and more satisfied with their life
  • I.2.2. But women are more exposed to depression than men
  • I.2.3. The happiness gap changes over the life cycle
  • I.2.4. A time trend?
  • I.2.5. Cross-country differences
  • Part II. Tentative explanations for the gender gap in subjective wellbeing
  • II.1. Education, wage, job characteristics, personality traits: unsuccessful candidates
  • II.1.1. Education
  • II.1.2. Job characteristics
  • II.1.3. Personality traits<br<II.2. The paid work-housework nexus
  • II.2.1. Facts about the division of tasks within the household
  • II.2.2. A preference for diversity?
  • II.2.3. Time stress: multi-tasking, routine tasks, stress and overload
  • II.2.4. “Doing gender”
  • II.2.5. The impact of institutions on gender equality (“Institutions trump gender”)
  • II.3. Disagreement and violence in the household
  • II.4. The role of expectations
  • II.4.1. Expectations and job satisfaction
  • II.4.2. Expectations and household work
  • II.5. Macro-Foundations and Institutions
  • II.5.1. Indicators of gender equality
  • II.5.2. Freedom and fundamental rights
  • II.5.3. The type of social protection system
  • Conclusions
  • 1. Wrapping up the findings
  • 1. Intra-household differentiation
  • 2. The role of expectations
  • 2. Policy conclusions
  • References
  • APPENDIX A Description of the Surveys
  • APPENDIX B Descriptive Statistics
  • APPENDIX C Results