• 1.0 Introduction
  • 1.1 Structure of the report
  • 2.0 Context for the study
  • 2.1 Competency of the EU
  • 2.2 EU anti-drugs policy
  • 2.3 United Nations Conventions
  • 2.4 Framework Decision 2004/757/JHA and its rationale
  • 3.0 Problem definition
  • 3.1 The problem of major Illicit drug trafficking
  • 3.2 Main drivers of the problems
  • 3.3 Who is affected by the problems and how?
  • 3.4 How would the problem evolve in the baseline scenario
  • 3.5 Right to act and subsidiarity
  • 4.0 Rationale, Objectives and Intervention Logic for a New EU Legislative Instrument
  • 4.1 Rationale
  • 4.2 Objectives and intervention logic
  • 5.0 Policy options
  • 5.1 Discarded options
  • 5.2 Legal basis and decision-making procedure
  • 5.3 Consistency of the options with EU policies and fundamental rights
  • 5.4 Assessment criteria
  • 5.5 Cluster A – scope for action
  • 5.6 Cluster B – definition of offences
  • 5.7 Cluster C – level of sanctions (Imprisonment)
  • 5.8 Cluster D – financial penalties
  • 5.9 Financial penalties for legal persons
  • 5.10 Cluster E – aggravating and mitigating circumstances
  • 5.11 Cluster F – jurisdiction
  • 5.12 Territorial jurisdiction
  • 5.13 Cluster G – judicial and law enforcement co-operation
  • 5.14 Cluster H – Data and statistics
  • 6.0 Comparison of the options and identification of the preferredoption
  • 6.1 Comparison of impacts of the policy options
  • 6.2 Scope for action
  • 6.3 Definition of offences
  • 6.4 Level of sanctions
  • 6.5 Financial penalties
  • 6.6 Aggravating and mitigating circumstances
  • 6.7 Jurisdiction
  • 6.8 Judicial and law enforcement cooperation
  • 6.9 Data and statistics
  • 6.10 Outline of the preferred policy option
  • 7.0 Monitoring and evaluation
  • Annex One: List of interviewees
  • Annex Two: Research Materials
  • Annex Three: Summary Tables
  • Annex Four: Detailed Cost Analysis