• ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
  • INTRODUCTION
  • 1. EXTORTION RACKETEERING IN THE EUROPEAN AGENDA
  • 2. HOW EXTORTION IS LINKED TO ORGANISED CRIME: A LITERATURE ANALYSIS
  • 2.1 Extortion Racketeering as an organised crime activity
  • 2.2 Extortion Racketeering in the Legitimate Markets
  • 2.3 Extortion Racketeering in Illegal Markets
  • 2.4 Extortion as a Mafia-Crime
  • 2.5 Extortion Racketeering as a Crime Affecting Transition Economies
  • 2.6 The Perpetrators
  • 2.7 The Victims
  • 3. EU COUNTRY PROFILES
  • 3.1 - Austria
  • 3.2 - Belgium
  • 3.3 - Bulgaria
  • 3.4 - Cyprus
  • 3.5 - Czech Republic
  • 3.6 - Denmark
  • 3.7 - Estonia
  • 3.8 - Finland
  • 3.9 - France
  • 3.10 - Germany
  • 3.11 - Greece
  • 3.12 - Hungary
  • 3.13 - Ireland
  • 3.14 - Italy
  • 3.15 - Latvia
  • 3.16 - Lithuania
  • 3.17 - Luxembourg
  • 3.18 - Malta
  • 3.19 - Poland
  • 3.20 - Portugal
  • 3.21 - Romania
  • 3.22 - Slovakia
  • 3.23 - Slovenia
  • 3.24 - Spain
  • 3.25 - Sweden
  • 3.26 - The Netherlands
  • 3.27 - United Kingdom
  • 4. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE LEGISLATIVE MEASURES AND REGULATIONS DEALING WITH EXTORTION RACKETEERING
  • 5. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE PHENOMENON: CRITERIA FOR CLUSTERING EU MEMBER STATES
  • 5.1 Cluster n. 1: Geographical location
  • 5.2 Cluster n. 2: Presence of casual and systemic extortion in relation to the organizational structure of organised crime
  • 6. THE COVERAGE OF EXTORTION IN THE EUROPEAN UNION MEDIA
  • 7. FINDINGS
  • 7.1 The situations concerning extortion racketeering
  • 7.2 The law enforcement response to extortion racketeering
  • 7.3 The legislation and practices relating to the protection of victims and witnesses of extortion racketeering
  • 7.4 Assessing the vulnerability of 27 EU Member States to extortionracketeering
  • 8. RECOMMENDATIONS<br<BIBLIOGRAPHY
  • ANNEX 1 – THE QUESTIONNAIRE