• Executive summary
  • Introduction
  • I. North America: The origins of the concept of reasonable accommodation
  • 1. United States law
  • 2. Canadian law
  • II. Council of Europe
  • 1. Religion and belief: the back and forth of the European Court of Human Rights
  • 2. Ethnicity: The Roma as vulnerable group
  • 3. A case-by-case approach
  • III. European Union
  • 1. A reasonable accommodation duty focused on disability
  • 2. Disability-related "special" characteristics
  • 3. The response of the indirect discrimination device
  • 4. The logic of accommodation is not a new legal phenomenon
  • IV. Memberstates
  • 1. Religion and belief
  • 1.1 Time off for religious festivals and flexible working hours
  • 1.2 Dietary requirements and slaughtering of animals
  • 1.3 Accommodation of employment or vocational training requirements
  • 1.4 Religious symbols and dress codes
  • 1.5 Other cases
  • 2. Race and ethnic origin
  • 3. Age: Special duties to accommodate young and/or older workers
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • I. Publications
  • II. Legislation
  • III. Case-law