• 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. TWO ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS IN THE SUCCESSFUL CONSTRUCTION OF A SERIES OF INDICATORS
  • 2.1 An information system
  • 2.2 An education policy and/or an education plan
  • 3. SOME DEFINITIONS OF AND SOME GENERALITIES ABOUT INDICATORS
  • 3.1 What is an indicator?
  • 3.2 What needs to be measured?
  • 3.3 Defining the objectives of the education policy or education plan
  • 3.4 Some examples of objectives
  • 4. MOVING FROM OBJECTIVES TO INDICATORS
  • 4.1 u0093Education For Allu0094
  • 4.2 European Union indicators for lifelong learning
  • 4.3 Vocational education and training indicators collated by the European Training Foundation (ETF)
  • 5. HOW SHOULD INDICATORS BE CLASSIFIED?
  • 6. SUMMARY: DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS u0096 CAUSAL ANALYSIS
  • 7. SOME ADVICE WHEN CONDUCTING AN INDICATORS PROJECT
  • 8. THE VARIOUS STAGES IN WORK ON INDICATORS
  • 8.1 Inventory of available sources and data: different types of data, annual censuses, selective data and management data
  • 8.2 Calculation
  • 8.3 Verifying the consistency of results
  • 8.4 Analysis of the various indicators
  • 8.5 Using the document for internal and external evaluations: the critical need for transparency
  • 8.6 Updating the document
  • 9. OTHER USES OF INDICATORS: INTERNATIONAL COMPARISONS, REGIONAL DIVERSITY, AND MONITORING SCHOOLS
  • 10. THE SPECIAL CASE OF COMPARATIVE INTERNATIONAL INDICATORS
  • 10.1 Problems encountered at the last "Education For AU" evaluation in 2000
  • 10.2 Illustration of the problems encountered at "Education For AU" 2000
  • 10.3 How to carry out data comparison at international level
  • 11. SOME EXAMPLES OF HOW TO USE INDICATORS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING
  • 11.1 Monitoring the effective links between training and employment, the transformation of vocational training, and the establishment of diplomas and forms of vocational certification
  • 11.2 Monitoring human resource management in enterprises, and its impact on the recruitment of young people
  • 11.3 Observation and foreca