• Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • I Basic concepts and legal instruments
  • 1. Protection against discrimination in housing in European and international law
  • 1.1. European Union law
  • 1.2. Other European and international legal instruments
  • 2. Adequate housing, segregation and discrimination
  • 2.1. The concept of adequate housing
  • 2.2. Segregation
  • 2.3. Housing and discrimination: a multidimensional relationship
  • 3. National protection against discrimination in housing
  • 3.1. The grounds covered
  • 3.2. The scope of protection
  • II Discrimination in the supply of housing
  • 1. The lack of social housing
  • 2. Shelters for women who have been victims of domestic abuse
  • 3. Adapting housing for persons with disabilities
  • 3.1. International norms
  • 3.2. National measures taken
  • 3.2.1. Recognising a right to reasonable accommodation
  • 3.2.2. Providing financial assistance for the adaptation of housing
  • 3.2.3. Establishing accessibility standards
  • 4. Adapting housing for the elderly
  • 5. Respecting the traditional way of life of Travellers
  • 5.1. International norms
  • 5.2. The situation in Member States
  • III Discrimination in the allocation of housing
  • 1. Private Housing
  • 1.1. Renting private housing
  • 1.1.1. The groups affected by discrimination in access to privately rented housing
  • 1.1.2. The scope of discrimination law in privately rented housing
  • 1.2. Purchasing private housing
  • 1.2.1. Discrimination caused by private persons
  • 1.2.2. Discrimination caused by public authorities
  • 2. Public housing
  • 2.1. The forms of public housing in Europe
  • 2.2. The problem of (potentially) discriminatory practices
  • 2.3. The harmful effects of some allocation criteria
  • IV Discrimination during occupation of housing
  • 1. Harassment
  • 2. Terminating, not renewing or not transferring letting agreements
  • 3. Access to basic infrastructure and public services
  • 4. Security of tenure and eviction
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Case law