• Members of the European Network of Legal Experts in the Field of Gender Equality
  • Part I
  • Executive Summary
  • Susanne Burri
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The legislative context of EU law
  • 2.1. Treaties and Charter of Fundamental Rights
  • 2.2. Directives
  • 2.3. Soft law
  • 2.4. Indirect sex discrimination in EU law
  • 2.5. Equal treatment of part-time workers and fixed-term workers
  • 3. Aims and scope of the national reports
  • 4. Part-time work
  • 4.1. Definitions of part-time work
  • 4.2. General contexts
  • 4.3. National policies and national collective agreements
  • 4.4. CEDAW’s obligation to combat stereotypes
  • 4.5. National legislation on equal treatment of part-time workers
  • 4.6. Organisation of working time
  • 4.7. Case law and opinions of equality bodies
  • 4.8. Involvement of other parties
  • 4.9. Statutory social security and pension rights
  • 4.10. Self-employment
  • 4.11. Access to and supply of goods and services
  • 4.12. Gaps in national law
  • 5. Fixed-term work
  • 5.1. General context
  • 5.2. National policies
  • 5.3. The Framework Agreement on fixed-term work
  • 5.4. National legislation on equal treatment of fixed-term workers
  • 5.5. Pregnancy and maternity discrimination
  • 5.6. Successive fixed-term contracts
  • 6. Effectiveness
  • 7. Vulnerable groups
  • 8. Conclusions
  • 8.1. Sex discrimination in relation to part-time work
  • 8.2. Fixed-term contracts
  • Part II
  • National Law: Reports from the Experts of the Member States, EEA Countries, FYR ofMacedonia and Turkey
  • AUSTRIA
  • BELGIUM
  • BULGARIA
  • CROATIA
  • CYPRUS
  • CZECH REPUBLIC
  • DENMARK
  • ESTONIA
  • FINLAND
  • FRANCE
  • GERMANY
  • GREECE
  • HUNGARY
  • ICELAND
  • IRELAND
  • ITALY
  • LATVIA
  • LIECHTENSTEIN
  • LITHUANIA
  • LUXEMBOURG
  • FYR of MACEDONIA
  • MALTA
  • THE NETHERLANDS
  • NORWAY
  • POLAND
  • PORTUGAL
  • ROMANIA
  • SLOVAKIA
  • SLOVENIA
  • SPAIN
  • SWEDEN
  • TURKEY
  • UNITED KINGOM
  • Annex 1 Questionnaire
  • Annex II Bibliography